Tuesday, May 3, 2011

How to Use Surveys Effectively to Increase Client Satisfaction and Retention

Most service providers believe they're doing a good job for their clients...until the clients stop doing business with them.

If you've ever been blind-sided by a long-term customer leaving you for a competitor, or had a promising new account mysteriously drift away after just one or two engagements, be sure to attend this complimentary, business-building webinar on how you can use surveys to collect – and use - timely, actionable feedback on your products and services.

On Tuesday, May 17, at 1 PM EDT join Autotask Corporation Senior Vice President and Dean of Autotask Academy Len DiCostanzo and NEOSA Director Bradley Nellis as they cut through the clutter and show you how you can leverage customer survey and benchmarking tools to secure your current clients – and successfully attract new ones. You'll learn:

  • Why customer surveys are important to you and your business
  • The value of surveys to your customers
  • The real ROI of retaining your customers
  • Best practices for developing surveys
  • What to look for when selecting a effective survey tool
  • Using automation to scale survey delivery, and monitor results in real time
  • The importance of comparing your survey results with industry benchmarks
  • How to use surveys to continually improve your service delivery
  • Best practices for IT services benchmarking
Real-time feedback from customers is more than just 'nice to have'. It gives you the solid business intelligence you need to grow your business, and it's a critical component of ITIL's continual service improvement methodology. Best of all, it doesn't cost and arm and a leg and it isn't hard to do – if you have the right tools.

Register today!

1 comment:

  1. Why survey was created was to know what's in the mind of people, right? Using it for your company will help you stay in the business world longer; that is, if you know the basics when conducting a survey.

    Clark Adams

    ReplyDelete